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    May 16, 2021
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PROMOTION Local Flavour A spotlight on farming and local food and drink producers s we begin to enjoy broader face-to-face interactions someone else. You may have a suitable site restaurants. Following this theme, can you accommodate a range of retail and or building, access to capital or business skills, and they may have that spark for connecting with the public. Assuming a joint venture approach, as restrictions ease, it is activities to become a destination? Is it possible that with increased engagement between the rural community and the public, everyone \encouraging to hear some of the positive outcomes of the events of the last year. Stories of a greater knowledge and use of local and family-owned businesses, those with a greater connection with the local community and significantly shorter supply chains. From the local pub, farm butcher, farm shops, vineyards and home bakers, all adapting to survive and developing a stronger customer base for whatever the future holds. From new and increased the first step is probably a detailed discussion and agreement covering what you expect from each other in terms of time, capital, how profits and losses will be split. Is there a low risk/low-cost way to test the merits of the venture? What happens if things go well? Please do not set sail based on a cheery discussion in a pub garden and remember to revisit the legal arrangements, especially if things go well, will benefit? As with the excellent work done by Open Farm Sunday, a greater understanding and appreciation of how fruit, vegetables, cereals, and grapes are produced, could create a more positive environment for the rural economy. If you would like to discuss the implications covered in this article, please don't hesitate to get in touch. home delivery services, collection points and positive social media, to great word of mouth, many small producers and Don't rule out viticulture and the tourism opportunitles around it if that is an interest. There are some interesting businesses have made a real connection joint venture projects underway, and they don't need to be large or high risk. Have a coffee with your business advisor, before setting anything in stone, they will have some useful thoughts on business structures, financing and grants. Consider scale and diversity. I remember being shocked years ago by a restauranteur with the public which they hope to maintain and capitalise from to grow their businesses. Simon Budden is the Director of With low interest rates, enhanced capital allowances, declining mainstream subsidies and an increasing appetite for supporting and buying local produce, is this the time to consider new Agriculture at Kreston Reeves 0330 124 1399 simon.budden@krestonreeves.com diversification and growth opportunities for your rural business? If dealing with the public doesn't excite you, how about a jolnt venture with who was excited when new restaurants came to his area. His theory was always that if the area did well, everyone would benefit as tourists want a range of KRESTON REEVES Kreston Reeves has offices across Kent, London and Sussex. www.krestonreeves.com PROMOTION Local Flavour A spotlight on farming and local food and drink producers s we begin to enjoy broader face-to-face interactions someone else. You may have a suitable site restaurants. Following this theme, can you accommodate a range of retail and or building, access to capital or business skills, and they may have that spark for connecting with the public. Assuming a joint venture approach, as restrictions ease, it is activities to become a destination? Is it possible that with increased engagement between the rural community and the public, everyone \encouraging to hear some of the positive outcomes of the events of the last year. Stories of a greater knowledge and use of local and family-owned businesses, those with a greater connection with the local community and significantly shorter supply chains. From the local pub, farm butcher, farm shops, vineyards and home bakers, all adapting to survive and developing a stronger customer base for whatever the future holds. From new and increased the first step is probably a detailed discussion and agreement covering what you expect from each other in terms of time, capital, how profits and losses will be split. Is there a low risk/low-cost way to test the merits of the venture? What happens if things go well? Please do not set sail based on a cheery discussion in a pub garden and remember to revisit the legal arrangements, especially if things go well, will benefit? As with the excellent work done by Open Farm Sunday, a greater understanding and appreciation of how fruit, vegetables, cereals, and grapes are produced, could create a more positive environment for the rural economy. If you would like to discuss the implications covered in this article, please don't hesitate to get in touch. home delivery services, collection points and positive social media, to great word of mouth, many small producers and Don't rule out viticulture and the tourism opportunitles around it if that is an interest. There are some interesting businesses have made a real connection joint venture projects underway, and they don't need to be large or high risk. Have a coffee with your business advisor, before setting anything in stone, they will have some useful thoughts on business structures, financing and grants. Consider scale and diversity. I remember being shocked years ago by a restauranteur with the public which they hope to maintain and capitalise from to grow their businesses. Simon Budden is the Director of With low interest rates, enhanced capital allowances, declining mainstream subsidies and an increasing appetite for supporting and buying local produce, is this the time to consider new Agriculture at Kreston Reeves 0330 124 1399 simon.budden@krestonreeves.com diversification and growth opportunities for your rural business? If dealing with the public doesn't excite you, how about a jolnt venture with who was excited when new restaurants came to his area. His theory was always that if the area did well, everyone would benefit as tourists want a range of KRESTON REEVES Kreston Reeves has offices across Kent, London and Sussex. www.krestonreeves.com